How was Easter Island Formed

Where was Easter Island born?

People on Easter Island were known as Rapa Nui. The cave is actually a lava channel created by the volcanic eruptions that led to the formation of Easter Island. In this way, the constructions of the Moai, which were now scattered around the island, remained standing. The settlers' families formed ten tribes. History continues with the arrival and establishment of man on the island, his.

Isle of Easter: Country of Secrets (4)

The Easter Island is located about 500 km eastwards of the ridge of an undersea chain, the Eastern Pacific Rise, and is also in the Easter Rift area. It is considered to be the top of a huge hill formed by the pouring of melted vulcanic rocks from the seabed.

The island lies on a U-boat deck about 50 or 60 meters below the sea level, but 15 to 30 km off the shore, the deck ends and the seabed falls to 1800 to 3600 meters. The legend has it that Easter Island is part of a "much bigger country".

Gradual Pleistocene glaciations have reduced the water surface by at least 100 metres and sometimes even many a time. The Easter Island would then have been bigger than it is today. After the prevailing geologic legacies of tectonic plates, Easter Island was never part of a lost continen.

Mazière thought that the mythical Hiva was a long crest (the East Pacific Rise). It is becoming increasingly clear, as discussed below, that much bigger areas of the Pacific Ocean were once ashore. In platetectonics, the extreme outer layers of the world, the litosphere, are subdivided into individual "plates" which move against each other on a synthetic material coating underneath, the so-called stratosphere.

Platy Tectonic suggests that new marine crusts are continuously formed by the buoyancy of marine mage on the ridge of the North Sea (including the East Pacific Rise) and are fed back into the tectonic cloak along the ditches that are usually around the Pacific rim. That would mean that the whole sea rust should not be older than about 200 million years.

The cliffs that form the isles of St. Peter and Paul near the ridge of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, for example, are 350, 450, 835 and 2000 million years old, while according to tectonic plates they should be only 35 million years old. Rock form Tahiti in the South Pacific has proved to be over 800 million years old.

Seismic events occurring at various levels on the land side of sea ditches defined a Benioff area, which in tectonic plates is defined as a "descending plate". The way the sea rust is to go down into the thicker cloak has never been adequately described. It is intended to compensate for the volumetric mass of the shellfish formed at the oceans.

When the subductions really took place, huge quantities of marine deposits would have had to be scrapped off the seabed and stacked against the land edge of the graben. Platetectonics had to fall back on the far-fetched idea that smooth sea sand can gently slip into a subsduction area without any significant traces.

Another of the Benioff Areas is that they are very old ruptures caused by the cooldown and contractions of the soil and currently constitute the distortion point between the elevating island/continental area and the sloping sea ice and cloak. The majority of tectonists believe that the Pacific Sea island and sea mountain chain is the outcome of the Pacific Plate's movement over "hotspots" of the ascending mage.

The age of the Sala y Gomez archipelago (where Easter Island and Sala y Gomez Island are located) is not increasing in a systematic eastward direction. An alternate suggestion is that sea islets are formed by magnetism rising from much shallow water, perhaps from a web of magma'surge channels' in the litosphere.

There is a net of large textures or lines covering the coastlines and seas, many of which originate from the Precambrian. The Pacific Ocean has mega trends that intersect, consisting of burrs, rupture areas and seamless tracks that pass through NNW-SSE and WSW-ENE (Fig. 9.3). In tectonic design, seamounts should indicate the motion of the panels, but to create these mega trends, the panels would have to move in two axes simultaneously!

Even though tectonics engineers call "microtitre plates" and "hotspots" ad-hoc when needed, they cannot satisfactorily explain any of these mega trends and would rather overlook them. Three The Pacific'plate'. In addition, some mega trends are continuing on the continental territories of Australia, Asia, North and Latin America, where they connect with important Pre-Cambrian lines, meaning that the "oceanic" ridge at least partially consists of Pre-Cambrian rock - as has been corroborated by deep-sea excavations, drillings and seasonal datas.

Easter break is located on the megatrend of the Central Pacific, which stretches across the Pacific and South America to the Atlantic Ocean. There is a general argument that Easter Island can never have been part of a single continents, because it has never been inhabited by granites or sediments such as lime and sands.

The appearance of volcanoes does not show that the area in which they appear is not a submerged continen. When Africa would fade away two thousand threads (3660 m) southward of the Atlas, what would be overwater? According to today's information, the rest of the island would be made up of four volcano tops - Cameroon, Mount Kenya, Kilimanjaro and.....

Ruwenzori, together with one or more islands, which, like the others, would consist entirely of igneous rock. It is 40 km thick under northern Australia, 20 km thick in the east of the adjoining coral sea, 22-28 km thick in the Fiji-Tonga-Samoa area and up to 36 km thick on the Tonga Islands.

More than 100 underwater plateaux and crests, strewn across the ocean and littered with islets, and many of them are immersed mainland remains that have not been completely'oceanized', as the'anomalous' thick ridge and finds of'impossible' old mainland rock suggest. The Easter Island legend tells of the first colonists who arrived after their homeland disappeared and of a giants called Uoke, who caused a great continents to sink from which Easter Island is a relic in a rage.

There are similar continental disappearances throughout Polynesia and Melanesia, as well as in other areas of the Pacific. The Hawaiians, for example, thought that there was once a large peninsula that stretched from Hawaii to New Zealand, but it declined, and left only its mountain peaks as isles. While it is certain that no major Pacific coastlines have disappeared in recent thousands of years, some authors believe that adequately sized isles have.

In 1722, when the Dutchman Roggeveen found Easter Island, he was actually looking for Davis Land. A British pirate called John Davis said he had seen this island at 27°20'S in 1687. That is not true in any way for Easter Island. Today's general faith is that Davis had miscalculated his location, as was by no means uncommon among early sailors, and that Davis was Land Mangareva, the main island in the Gambier Islands, far western of Easter Island.

Mr Brown thought that Sala y Gomez, a craggy island about 415 km north-east of Easter Island, was probably the remnants of Davis Land; there are plenty of cliffs around it and the waters around it are flat. The Osterinsulaner named it Motu Matiro Hiva, which means "island before Hiva", where Hiva is the name of her legend.

Aside from Easter Island Arcipelago, Spence and Brown argue that the country has also been in hiding in several other parts of the Pacific in the last few thousand years. For example, they noted that the Caroline Islands could be the remnants of a huge island kingdom in the Central Pacific East.

Mr Brown pointed out that no more than 50,000 inhabitants live within a 2,400 km area today, adding: "It is one of the wonders of the Pacific if we do not expect that there is twentyfold as much country as there is today. On the small island of Woleai, about 1600 km westward of Pohnpei, he found a typeface that is still in use, quite different from any other in the whole wide globe (see section 7).

A whole series of isles that sailors have told about have later disappeared. For example, in 1879, an ltalian master revealed the island of Podesta, just over a kilometer around, 1390 km from Valparaiso, Chile. It has not been found since then and was taken off the maps in 1935.

In 1912 an island near Easter Island was spotted, but never seen again. When a 1932 sea chart quest was unsuccessful, Sarah Ann Island north-west of Easter Island was taken off the nautical maps. In 1928, the master and two of the two officer on a luxurious English ship told that Easter Island itself had disappeared - but a Chilenean gun ship was sent to the island and found it in its normal place!

By 1955, US airmen saw an island 615 km western of Honolulu, but it vanished within a few short week, and left only sulphur stripes on the top. Two volcanoes were born on a UK battleship 320 km southwards of Tokyo in February 1946, rising to a maximum altitude of 15 metres and spreading over an area of about 2.5 km2.

Besides temporal volcanoes, which appear abruptly in deeper oceans, there are also small ones, which appear and disappear in flatter areas. Fonuafo'ou (Falcon Island) in the Tonga group, was in 1885, when an explosion erupted a swarm 88 meters above the sea level. {\*Metis Island, 120 km from Fonuafo'ou, appeared in 1875 and disappeared in 1899.

In 1823 Hunter Island was spotted at 15°31'S and 176°11'W. The island was never seen again. Three Tuanaki Island, part of the Cook group in the South Pacific, vanished around the mid-nineteenth centuary. Polynesians also lived on these archipelagos, but in 1844 a missionary vessel was unable to located them.

A number of former islanders who had gone away in their adolescence lost their lives in the twentieth century and were forced to leave their homes. Though some small archipelagos seem to have disappeared into the Pacific in the last thousands of years, the proof is that the archipelago on the order of magnitude that Spence and Brown had in their minds at that time is enormous.

However, as stated above, there were certainly land masses of a continent-sized nature in the Pacific in the later years. K.M. Hasse, P. Stoffers and C.D. Garbe-Schönberg,'The petrogenetical evolution of the lava from Easter Island and neighboring Seebergen, Near-Ridge Hotspot Volcano in the SE Pacific', Journal of Petrology, Volume 38, No. 6, 1997, pp. 785-813.

R.I. Rusby,'GLORIA and other Georophysical Investigations of the Tectonical Patterns and Histories of the Easter Microplate, South-East Pacific', in: S: Chatterjee and N. Hotton III (ed.), New Concepts in Global Tectonics, Lubbock, TX: J.G. Clark and J. Dymond,'Geochronology and Petochemistry of Easter and Sala y Gomez Islands: Consequences for the formation of the Sala y Gomez Ridge', Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, vol. 2, 1977, pp. 29-48.

N.C. Smoot,'Magma Flooding, micro plates and perpendicular intersections', New Concepts in Global Tectonics Newsletter, No. A. A. Meyerhoff, I. Taner, A. E. L. Morris, W. B. Agocs, M. Kaymen-Kaye, M. I. Bhat, N. C. Smoot and D. R. Choi, Surge Tectonics: P.E. Baker,'Preliminary Presentation of Recent Easter Island Geology Studies', Geology Magazine, Vol. 104, No. 2, 1967, pp. 116-22.

Atlantologie : grundlegende Probleme, Honolulu, HA : University Press of the Pacific, 2001 (1970), S. 150-1. J.W. Gregory,'The geologic story of the Pacific Ocean', Quarterly Journal of Geologic Society, vol. 86, 1930, pp. 72-136 (p. 132). E.M. Ruditch,'The Arctic Sea without Spread', in: A: Barto-Kyriakidis (ed.), Critical Aspects of Platy Tektonics, Athens:

The Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, Memoir 17, 1994, S. 67-80 ; D.R. Choi,'Geology of the South-East Pacific', Teile 1-3, New Concepts in Global Tectonics Newsletter, Nr. 7, S. 11-15 ; Nr. 8, S. 8-13 ; Nr. 9, S. 12-14, 1998. B.I. Vasiliev & D.R. Choi,'Geology and Tectonical Evolution of the Pacific.

Part 3: Layout and construction of the basement', Newcepts in Global Tektonics Newsletter, No. 48, 2008, p. 23-51; B.I. Vasiliev & T. Yano,'Ancient and Contemporary Rock Discovery in the Sea Floor', Newcepts in Global Toptonics Newsletter, no. L.S. Dillon,'Neovolcanism: a Suggested Substitute for the Concept of Platy Tectonic and Contemporary Drift', in:

C. F. Kahle (Hrsg.), Platform Testonics - Assessments and Reassessments, Memoir 23, Tulsa, OK : American Association of Petroleum Geologists, 1974, S. 167-239 (S. 222) ; Zhirov, Atlantis, S. 154-5. The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 45. Mystery of the Pacific, p. 52.

The Pacific Ocean and its isles. Colonisation of the Pacific began about 50,000 years ago, when hunters and collectors colonised Australia and New Guinea in the West Pacific at a point in history when they came ashore due to the lower levels caused by the glacial period.

The migration went east and arrived in the North Solomon islands about 28,000 years ago. It is assumed that the Polyynesian isles have only been inhabited for about 2000 years, as it took the Polynesians a long pause to acquire the navigation skills that would enable them to cruise far off the coast.

But the data for the colonization of the various Asian isles are very timid, as they are mainly derived from the oldest carbon radiate data available to date; further excavation and discovery may indicate that man's colonization goes back thousands of years in time. As an example, despite stubborn denial by many Othodox archeologists, there is increasing proof of trans-Atlantic and trans-Atlantic contact between a wide range of old civilizations, among them the Egyptians, Libyans, Phoenicians, Greeks, Arabs, Hindus, Draviders, Chinese, Mayans and Incas.

A number of old charts offer enticing but disputed proof that the planet was charted over 10,000 years ago, during the last glacial period. There may have been several migratory phases from different angles into the Pacific, and a period of time far longer than that of the principal archaeologist.

There are many testimonies from the first few Europeans about the different colours of Polynesians' skins on different isles and on the same island. It seems that for many thousand years there have been trading relations, intercultural transfer and migration from Asia, India and the Middle East via the Pacific to America and also from America via the Pacific back to Asia.

This short walk through the Pacific Ocean concentrates on the remnants of monuments and monuments of Megalithsarchy. Like on Easter Island, some of the structure can be the work of very old and as yet unfamiliar civilizations. Aboriginal peoples (descendants of the old Chamorros) denied all information of the builder and attributed the rocks to the "spirits of prehistoric men".

A different point of view is that the higher laths once carried the top of old churches, as in the temple of Luxor in Karnak, Egypt. The Pohnpei (or Ponape, also known as Ascension ) is a vulcanic island in the East Caroline Islands and could have been the center of a lost imperium. Nan Madol, the'Venice of the Pacific', is located in the Pohnpei Laguna on the south-east shore.

Comprising more than 18 km2, the nucleus of the site measures about 1.5 km x 0.5 km and contains 92 man-made islets, constructed in the lake and encircled by a canal. They were made by piling large, mostly under 10 ton heavy, six-sided basaltic primers on the island's shallow wall and charging the island-center.

The ash on the bottom of a fireplace on one of the man-made islets dates back to 1000 AD, but this only shows that the town was occupied at that period - not that the whole town was made then. Insaru, an old, gigantic stony town on the island of Lelu, bordering Kosrae (the most eastern of the Caroline Islands), also consisted of gigantic basaltic ramparts and spirepids, the island and building being crossed by a sewer system linked to the sea.

Several of the wall are over 6 metres high and the basaltic boulders are up to 50 tonnes in weight. The Palau Island, the most westerly of the Caroline family, has over 5% of its territory in terraces, and entire mounds are shaped like stepped pathways. Bairulchan on Babeldaob is a Bairulchan magalithic site with two lines of large basaltic boulders, some of which are sculptured with face-parts.

There are similar rocks on Vao and Malekula on the Vanuata Islands (New Hebrides). Canyon monolithes on Palau's island of Babeldoab. Polynesia's Polynesia Delta extends from New Zealand in the south-west via Hawaii in the North to Easter Island in the south-east. There are nowhere else in the Pacific as many impressing Mexican remnants in such a small area as on Easter Island.

However, there are some remarkable features on other isles. Tongatapu Island on the Tonga Island has the only southern Pacific arc of megalith - the Ha'amonga tri-lithon. Mu'a (formerly Lapaha), a channel town on Tongatapu, has many magalithic decks (known as Langi).

Solid cliffs at an old harbour on the side of the Mu'a lagoons indicate that once there were mega-ships. In the last few thousand years, the island has increased by one meter and today there are no longer any useful facilities like the quay and canal/ditch. Due to carbodating it is assumed that Samoa was populated by the Lapita around 1200 BC, about the same period as Tonga.

There is a huge shallow hilltop on the island of Savai'i known as Pulemelei - the biggest preserved hill in Polynesia. In Rarotonga, the biggest of the Cook Islands, the ear was pierced and the ear lobes lengthened, as was the case on Easter Island, in old India and in Peru. It has a huge street that once surrounded the whole island and several pyramid-shaped decks.

It' better built than the streets of Malden Island, and similar to Peru. All over the Society Islands there are cut-off pyramid-shaped decks or maraea, some of which are made of precisely formed and adapted pieces of meegalithic masonry. Tahiti's biggest of all Polynesia's rock buildings was Mahaiatea Hill.

The carving was made on Raivavae (one of the Austral Islands), the Polynesia devotional center, but is now in the Gauguin Museum of Tahiti. Allegations that the Easter Island statue of Easter Island is a product of the Polyynesian Czeck. The Marae Taputapuatea on Raiatea (the biggest of the Leeward Islands) is 43 metres long, 7.3 metres broad and up to 3.7 metres high.

The Huahine and Bora Bora are like Raiatea's maraae made of large plates of corals, while similar Tahiti and Moorea are made of round rocks of bassin. All over the Marquesas Islands, the ruins of large rock outcrops, masonry houses and patios, most of which are covered with jungles, are evidence of a lost civilization.

No masonry was found that could be compared to Ahu Vinapu on Easter Island. The unrenovated old ceremonies center in the Taipivai Valley on Nuku Hiva is one of the most impressing archeological places. Vahangeku'a Tohua, Nuku Hiva, 19 megalithic 3 m high masonry. Suggs nevertheless thought that the platform was still being built in the middle of the 18th century!

It had got into the usual mistake that the data from artefacts or graves found in connection with malgalithic constructions are dependable indications of when the initial construction took place. The buildings could of course be several thousand years older and have been repeatedly refurbished, converted or extended.

Today the Marquesas Island has about 8000 residents. It is often thought that the Marquesas were populated by West Polynesians, probably from Tonga or Samoa, around 300 AD, but Suggs argued that they were populated much sooner, around 300-500 BC. It is thought that the Polynesians were one of the major points from which they extended in the Pacific; the Marquesan tongue is very much related to the Hawaiian, Mangareva and Easter Island tongues.

One of the minorities opinion is that the Marquesas from Mexico or Peru were settled, but the adversaries point out that no Latin America potteries or implements were found in Polynesia. Nevertheless, there are indications that the Marquesas, as one of the easternmost parts of Polynesia, play a pivotal part in the mutual contact between Asia and America.

There were many old civilizations that knew the important astronomic series known as the pre-cession of the equinox. Two numbers such as 54, 72, 108, 144 and 180 (all times 18) are called pre-cession numbers and were particularly important in old companies. If we take the Giza-Heliopolis in Egypt as a zero ameridian for length measurement, we find that the large Angkor Wat temples in Cambodia are 72 degrees eastern of the Giza maridian, the Nan Madol at Pohnpei 54 degrees eastern of Angkor and astronomic Megalite structure on the Kiribati and Tahiti Isles 72 degrees and 108 degrees eastern of Angkor, respectively.

If we look 144 degrees eastwards of Angkor (also 144 degrees westwards of Giza), we find only one island nearby: Osterinsel, which is a little over 3 (just under 320 km) eastern of the precise position. It is Hancock's belief that Easter Island may have been populated as a kind of geodesic lighthouse, or markers, that performed some functions not yet guessed in an old system of heaven-ground co-ordinates that connected many so-called "world navels".

There is a huge and distinctive light exactly 180 degree easterly of Angkor (and 108 degree westerly of Giza), and almost as far southward of the Ecuador (13 degree 48 minutes) as Angkor northward of it (13 degree 26 minutes). Pyramid's real roots from Egypt to America, New York:

Asiatic Impacts in Early South America in Myths, Migrations and Histories, London: Yelsraek Publishing, 2003; David Hatcher Childress, Ancient Tonga & the Lost City of Mu'a, Stelle, IL: Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996, pp. 76-9. Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient K K Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea King, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1996 (1966) ; Graham Hancock, Inworld : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient Sea World : Maps of the Ancient K end :

Ancient Micronesia & the Lost City of Nan Madol, Stelle, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1998, S. 139.

Acquaintance: William R. Corliss (comp.), Antique Infrastructure: Mikronesia, pp. 43-51; Michael Joseph, 1998, pp. 202-3, 206-7. Old Micronesia, p. 85. http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/places/images/ga/palau_pillars. jpg; Old Micronesia, p. 110. Childress, Antique Tonga, p. 160/1. Corliss, Antique Infrastructures, p. 267; http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/p/m/23b06b. Childress, David Hatcher, First Cities of Antiquity Lemuria & the Pacific, Stelle, IL : Adventures Unlimited Press, 1988, S. 205-7.

The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. The Riddle The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/ The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/ The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. 2006 The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. 7 The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. or The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. paper The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. t The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. Be The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. Be The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. Be The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. S The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. S The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. S The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. Car The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. Cal The Riddle of the Pacific, Kempton, IL : Adventures Unlimited, 1996 (1924), S. 44/5. http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~rwj1/POLY/poly008s.html. Cal. Mystery of Easter Island, London: Antique Tonga, pp. 79-81.

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